103 Stunning Satellite Photos That Will Change How You See Our World

Benjamin Grant was collecting striking satellite pictures of planet earth since 2014 and published them on his website with an aim of changing the way we look at our planet, and to show the effects of Human intervention that can be found in nature.

Every single day, Grant shares one photo from a Satellite company called DigitalGlobe to change the way we see our planet. “With a focal length 16 times longer than a standard DSLR camera, the cameras are so powerful that you can take a picture of a beach ball on the Golden Gate Bridge in full resolution…from Los Angeles,” Grant describes further. “I try to present the images with no bias and let people decide what these altered landscapes mean, based on the facts and the visual evidence in the frame. I believe that this perspective is a means to start a conversation about the condition of our planet and how we can better protect it.”

“I create the images by stitching together numerous high-resolution satellite photographs. I partnered with a satellite company called DigitalGlobe and accordingly have access to their full archive of imagery. Once I have put together a composite image, I then treat it like a photograph to make it as crisp and easy to understand as possible to accentuate certain patterns, colors, or places.” The results are so amazing, Grant has even put together a book of over 200 high-resolution satellite photographs. It’s titled “Overview: A New Perspective of Earth”, and can be purchased through Amazon.

More info: dailyoverview.com | Instagram |  Amazon

#1 The Blooming Tulip Fields In Lisse, Netherlands

Blooming Tulip Fields In Lisse, Netherlands
Check out this Overview, which captures the blooming tulip fields in Lisse, Netherlands. These vibrant flowers are at their peak in April of each year

#2 Northumberlandia, Or “Lady Of The North”, Northern England

Lady Of The North Northern England
Northumberlandia, or “Lady of the North,” is a massive land sculpture in the shape of a reclining female figure near the town of Cramlington in northern England. Completed in 2012, the sculpture is made of 1.5 million metric tonnes of earth removed from the neighboring Shotton Surface Mine. It is 112 feet (34 m) high and 1,300 feet (400 m) long

#3 Willie Creek, Western Australia

Willie Creek, Western Australia
Willie Creek is a protected tidal estuary roughly 10.5 miles (17 km) north of Broome, Western Australia. The creek’s calm, nutrient-rich waters make it an ideal habitat for the Pinctada maxima oyster, which produces world-renowned pearls

#4 Everglades National Park, Florida

Everglades National Park, Florida
Everglades National Park in Florida is the largest tropical wilderness in the United States east of the Mississippi River, covering more than 1.5 million acres. The park was established in 1934 to protect the area’s fragile ecosystem and is home to 36 threatened or protected species including the American crocodile and West Indian manatee

#5 Plaza Del Ejecutivo, Mexico City

Plaza Del Ejecutivo, Mexico City
Radiating streets surround the Plaza Del Ejecutivo in the Venustiano Carranza district of Mexico City, Mexico. This district — which is home to more than 430,000 people — contains three of Mexico City’s large traditional markets, including La Merced, Mercado de Sonora, and Mercado Jamaica

#6 Cluster Of Tetrapods, Hong Kong

Cluster Of Tetrapods, Hong Kong
A cluster of tetrapods is seen near the High Island Reservoir in Hong Kong. These concrete structures are used to reinforce shoreline defenses and prevent coastal erosion by breaking up incoming waves. The specific shape of the tetrapod allows water to flow around rather than against the concrete and reduces displacement by interlocking

#7 Sahara Desert, Algeria

Sahara Desert, Algeria
The climate in this region is torrid and almost rainless, with an average annual rainfall of fewer than 0.4 inches (10 mm). In the summer, daytime temperatures are known to consistently reach 122°F (50°C), earning this area its nickname — the “triangle of fire”

#8 Kawah Ijen, Indonesia

Kawah Ijen, Indonesia
Kawah Ijen is a stratovolcano in the East Java Province of Indonesia. It has a 0.6-mile-wide (1 km) turquoise-colored acidic crater lake, which is the site of a major sulfur mining operation. At night, when sulfuric gases make contact with fresh air, electric blue flames can be seen rising from volcano up to 16 feet (5 m) high

#9 Logan County, Colorado

Logan County, Colorado
Much of the county’s 1,845 square miles (4,780 sq. km) is used for farming, ranching or related activities, making it one of the most productive agricultural counties in the state. Shown in the bottom half of this image is the small town of Peetz, which has more wind turbines (300) than residents (238)

#10 Roebuck Bay, Western Australia

Roebuck Bay, Western Australia
Roebuck Bay is a 210-square-mile (550 sq. km) tropical marine embayment in the Kimberley Region of Western Australia. Much of the Bay’s eastern edge contains tidal creeks, which create vein-like patterns on its red sandy beaches. Mangrove swamps connected to these tidal creeks serve as important nursery areas for marine fish and crustaceans

#11 Rooftops In Sisteron, Southeastern France

Rooftops In Sisteron, Southeastern France
Check out this amazing view above rooftops in Sisteron, a commune in the Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur region of southeastern France. This small community has been inhabited for more than 4,000 years and currently has roughly 7,300 residents. Apart from its beautiful countryside, tourist attractions in Sisteron include its citadel, the 12th-century former Sisteron Cathedral, and the Musée Terre et Temps — museum about earth and the measurement of time

#12 Canola Flower Fields, China

Canola Flower Fields, China
Canola flower fields cover the mountainous landscape of Luoping County, China. The crop is grown for the production of oil, which is extracted by slightly heating and then crushing the flower seeds. Canola oil is primarily used as a source of biodiesel and is also a key ingredient in many foods

#13 Greenhouses In Almeria, Spain

Greenhouses In Almeria, Spain
Greenhouses in Almeria, Spain, cover approximately 20,000 hectares of land (more than 75 square miles). The use of plastic covering (known as “plasticulture”) is designed to increase product yield, increase produce size, and shorten growth time. For a sense of scale, this Overview shows roughly six square miles

#14 Akimiski Island, Canada

Akimiski Island, Canada
Akimiski Island is the largest island in James Bay (a southeasterly extension of Hudson Bay), Canada. Most of the vegetation covering the island consists of lichen, moss, sedges and black dwarf spruce, giving it a vibrant color scheme from the aerial perspective. The island has no year-round human inhabitants; however, it is home to the 1,300-square-mile (3,367-sq-km) Akimiski Island Migratory Bird Sanctuary

#15 The Hoover Dam, Situated On The Border Of Nevada And Arizona

The Hoover Dam, Situated On The Border Of Nevada And Arizona
The Hoover Dam is a concrete arch-gravity dam in the Black Canyon of the Colorado River, situated on the border of Nevada and Arizona. Standing 726.4 feet (221.4 m) tall and 1,244 feet (376 m) long, it impounds Lake Mead, the largest reservoir in the United States by volume. Construction of the Hoover Dam between 1931 and 1936 served as a massive public works project of the Great Depression, employing thousands of workers — in fact, when the dam was authorized, nearly 20,000 unemployed individuals flocked to Las Vegas (a city of just 5,000 at the time) in hopes of finding work

#16 Canyon Lake, California

Canyon Lake, California
Canyon Lake is a city and gated community in southern California, with a population of slightly more than 11,000 people. Constructed as a master-planned community in 1968, it is one of just five gated cities in the state. In 2006, it was featured in “United Gates of America,” a BBC documentary that explored why people live in gated communities and what effects it has on them

#17 “Galaxia”, Nevada

Galaxia Nevada
“Galaxia” was The Temple at this year’s Burning Man Festival in the Black Rock Desert of Nevada. Designed by French architect Arthur Mamou-Mani, it is shaped of 20 timber trusses converging as a spiral towards one point in the sky. According to the artist, the design “celebrates hope in the unknown, stars, planets, black holes, the movement uniting us in swirling galaxies of dreams”

#18 Swanson Dock, Australia

Swanson Dock, Australia
Swanson Dock is an international shipping facility on the north bank of the Yarra River in Melbourne, Australia. It and several other docks make up the Port of Melbourne, one of Australia’s largest ports for containerized and general cargo. Swanson Dock East has a berth length of 2,900 feet (884 m), six container cranes and 99 acres (40 hectares) of container storage, while Swanson Dock West has 3,097 feet (944 m) of wharves, seven cranes and 84 acres (34 hectares) of storage space

#19 3-D Paintings On The Roof Of The Seattle Center Armory, Washington

3-D Paintings On The Roof Of The Seattle Center Armory, Washington
Don’t worry — even though they look real, these giant spiders are just 3-D paintings on the roof of the Seattle Center Armory in Seattle, Washington. Muralist Marlin Peterson painted these two Opiliones, or “Harvestmen” arachnids in August 2012 through a grant from the Washington State Artist Trust. Situated just under the iconic Space Needle observation tower, the mural is viewed from above by nearly 1.3 million visitors per year

#20 Great Exuma Island, Bahamas

Great Exuma Island, Bahamas
Several cays extend off the western coast of Great Exuma Island in the Bahamas. Great Exuma is the largest of more than 365 islands in the Exuma district, with an area of 61 square miles (158 sq. km). The Tropic of Cancer, also known as the Northern Tropic, runs across a beach located on Great Exuma

#21 Loosdrecht, Netherlands

Loosdrecht, Netherlands
Loosdrecht is a town of roughly 8,600 inhabitants in the North Holland Province of the Netherlands. It is known for its lakes, the Loosdrechtse Plassen, which attract thousands of tourists each year. Surrounding these lakes are hundreds of peat polders — low-lying pieces of reclaimed land protected by dikes, around 4,000 of which exist in the Netherlands

#22 Venice, Italy

Venice, Italy
Venice, Italy, is situated upon 118 small islands that are separated by canals and linked by bridges. After a series of heavy storms, much of the city has been flooded this week as high tide rose to more than 61 inches (156 cm) above average sea level. At least 11 people have been killed due to storms across the country, and flood waters in many of Venice’s streets reached knee height at the beginning of the week. With tide waters expected to rise to perilous levels in the coming decades, the city has constructed 78 giant steel gates across the three inlets through which water from the Adriatic could surge into Venice’s lagoon

#23 The Greater Caucasus Mountains, Situated On The Border Between Russia And Georgia

The Greater Caucasus Mountains, Situated On The Border Between Russia And Georgia

#24 Seoul, South Korea

Seoul, South Korea
Seoul is the capital and largest metropolis of South Korea, with more than 25 million residents in its metropolitan area. Strategically situated on the Han River, Seoul’s history can be traced back more than 2,000 years to 18 BC, when it was founded by members of the Baekje Kingdom. In recent years, the city has experienced massive economic growth and is one of the top 10 wealthiest cities in the world with a GDP of more than $700 billion (USD)

#25 London, Great Britain

London, Great Britain
Check out this amazing Overview of London at night. As the capital and most populous city in Great Britain, London is also one of the leading tourist destinations in the world. In 2015, it was ranked as the most visited city in the world, with more than 65 million visits

#26 San Francisco, California

San Francisco, California
DigitalGlobe’s newest satellite, the WorldView-3, was a remarkable 800 miles away over the Pacific Ocean when this Overview was captured. The focal length of the satellite camera is 32 times longer than a standard DSLR camera, making an image like this possible. Within the Overview, many of the city’s landmarks are visible, including the Golden Gate and Bay Bridges, Alcatraz, and Golden Gate Park

#27 Sound Of Speed Airshow, Missouri

Sound Of Speed Airshow, Missouri
In this Overview, spectators explore a variety of aircraft during the Sound of Speed Airshow, which took place last weekend at Rosecrans Memorial Airport in St. Joseph, Missouri. The event included aerial performances and ground displays of dozens of aircraft, including U.S. Navy Blue Angels, C-130 Hercules transporters, P-51 Mustangs, an F-16 Viper, and more

#28 Paris, France

Paris, France
Paris is the capital and most populous city in France, with a population of roughly 2.2 million. Since the 17th century, it has been one of Europe’s major centers of finance, commerce, fashion, science and the arts

#29 The Camp Fire, Northern California

The Camp Fire, Northern California
The Camp Fire, which is currently burning in Northern California, has become the deadliest wildfire in state history with a death toll of 42 as of this morning

#30 The Mill Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant, Ohio

The Mill Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant, Ohio
The Mill Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant is the largest plant in the Metropolitan Sewer District of Greater Cincinnati, Ohio, treating roughly 100 million gallons (378 million liters) of wastewater a day. The sewer district’s service area encompasses more than 290 square miles (751 sq. km) and serves a population of more than 850,000

#31 Chongqing, Southwest China

Chongqing, Southwest China
Chongqing is a major city in southwest China with an urban population of nearly 8.2 million. Located along the Jialing (left) and Yangtze (right) Rivers, it serves as one of the most important inland ports in China. Numerous luxury cruise ships terminate at Chongqing, and coal, raw materials and containerized goods also pass through the city aboard cargo ships

#32 Nice, France

Nice, France
Nice is the fifth most populated city in France, with roughly one million inhabitants in its metropolitan area. Located in southeastern France on the Mediterranean Sea, Nice is part of the tourist-popular French Riviera. It has one of the highest hotel capacities in France and is visited by more than four million tourists each year

#33 Kensico Reservoir In The Town Of Valhalla, New York

Kensico Reservoir In The Town Of Valhalla, New York
A bridge crosses the Kensico Reservoir in the town of Valhalla, New York. Located about 15 miles (24 km) north of New York City, the reservoir stores water received from the Catskill Mountains and provides a site for fishing and boating recreation. With an average depth of nearly 44 feet (13.5 m) and a maximum depth of 120 feet (37 m), it can hold 30 billion gallons (113 billion liters) of water

#34 Chausey, English Channel

Chausey, English Channel
Chausey is a group of small islands, islets, and rocks in the English Channel, off the coast of Normandy, France. The archipelago comprises 365 islands at low tide, but only 52 islands at high tide. Grande-Île, the main island, is 0.93 miles (1.5 km) long and 0.3 miles (0.5 km) wide at its widest. It is the only inhabited island in the Chausey group, with roughly 30 residents

#35 Southern California Logistics Airport, California

Southern California Logistics Airport, California
In this Overview, 25 airplanes are parked in a cluster at the Southern California Logistics Airport in Victorville, California. Also known as Victorville Airport, it is home to Southern California Aviation, a large transitional facility for commercial aircraft. No commercial passenger services are offered at the airport except for fixed-based operator and charter flights

#36 Mcmurdo Station, Antarctica

Mcmurdo Station, Antarctica
McMurdo Station is a United States research center on the southern tip of Ross Island in Antarctica. It is one of three U.S. Antarctic science facilities and the largest community on the continent, capable of supporting 1,258 residents. It boasts a harbor, three airfields, a heliport, more than 100 buildings, and Antarctica’s only two ATMs

#37 Mossel Bay, South Africa

Mossel Bay, South Africa
Mossel Bay is located on the Cape St. Blaize Peninsula, jutting off of South Africa into the Indian Ocean. The harbor town is home to roughly 130,000 people and is recognized as a center for both tourism and agriculture

#38 The Pierce County Container Terminal, Washington

The Pierce County Container Terminal, Washington
The Pierce County Container Terminal is part of the Port of Tacoma, located in Washington State. The 140-acre (56.7 hectare) facility has two berths totaling 2,087 feet (636 m) in length and seven cranes. Every year, the Port of Tacoma handles between 9 and 13 million tons of cargo and more than $25 billion of commerce

#39 Palmanova, Italy

Palmanova, Italy
45.904892400°, 13.317671100°. Here’s one of my favorite images from the ‘Where We Design’ chapter in “Overview”. The town of Palmanova, Italy is recognized by its concentric layout known as a star fort. The rationale for this construction was that an attack on any individual wall could be defended from the two adjacent star points by shooting the enemy from behind. The three rings that surround Palmanova were completed in 1593, 1690, and 1813.

#40 Beach Pool, Mona Vale, NSW, Australia

Beach Pool, Mona Vale, NSW, Australia
-33.6787655, 151.3160979. Check out this incredible shot of the ocean pool at Mona Vale Beach, located in the suburbs of Sydney, Australia. There are a number of public ocean pools in New South Wales, offering stunning areas to swim, situated on the rocky coast, with waves splashing into the pool.

#41 Valparaíso, Chile

Valparaíso, Chile
“Overview” — Valparaíso, Chile is built upon dozens of steep hillsides overlooking the Pacific Ocean. Known as “The Jewel of the Pacific,” the city is the sixth largest in the county and is home to approximately 285,000 residents. To learn more about the book, click here:

#42 Bourtange, Vlagtwedde, Netherlands

Bourtange, Vlagtwedde, Netherlands
53.0066°N 7.1920°E. Bourtange is a village with a population of 430 in the municipality of Vlagtwedde in the Netherlands. The star fort was built in 1593 during the Eighty Years’ War when William I of Orange wanted to control the only road between Germany and the city of Groningen. Bourtange was restored to its mid-18th-century state in 1960 and is currently used as an open-air museum.

#43 Boca Raton, Florida

Boca Raton, Florida
26.386332°, – 80.179917°. Residential development is seen in Boca Raton, Florida, USA. Because many cities in the state contain master-planned communities, often built on top of waterways in the latter half of the twentieth century, there are a number of intricate designs that are visible from the Overview perspective. Boca Raton is home to roughly 91,000 residents.

#44 Bahamas

Bahamas
Stunning blue waters surround and pass through the tidal channels of islands in the Bahamas. Small tidal changes on the banks cause water to flow through the narrow channels between the islands, first in one direction and then the other. The darker blue sections of water are the deepest parts of the channels and the surrounding light blue color is more shallow (less than 25 meters / 80 feet). This photo was captured from the International Space Station and is courtesy of NASA

#45 Seville, Spain

Seville, Spain
This solar concentrator in Seville, Spain use 2,650 heliostat mirrors to collect and focus the sun’s thermal energy to heat molten salt flowing through a 460-foot tall central tower. The molten salt then circulates from the tower to a storage tank where it is used to produce steam and generate electricity. In total, the facility displaces approximately 30,000 tons of CO2 emissions every year.

#46 Al Falah Housing Project, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

Al Falah Housing Project, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates
24.445187, 54.719998. The Al Falah Housing Project is located in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. The development covers 12.5 million square meters with 4,857 villas as well as mosques, schools, a shopping mall, and a hospital.

#47 Salt And Clay Pan, Namib Desert, Namibia

Salt And Clay Pan, Namib Desert, Namibia
Salt and clay pan located on the edge of the Namib Desert in Namibia. These reddish sand dunes of the desert, seen in the top half of this Overview, are among the tallest in the world, with many rising more than 656 feet (200 meters).

#48 Pivot Irrigation Fields, Wadi As-Sirhan Basin, Saudi Arabia

Pivot Irrigation Fields, Wadi As-Sirhan Basin, Saudi Arabia
30.089890096°, 38.271806556°. Center pivot irrigation is used throughout the Wadi As-Sirhan Basin of Saudi Arabia. Water is mined from depths as great as one kilometer (~3,000 ft), pumped to the surface, and evenly distributed by sprinklers that rotate 360 degrees. Spurred by a government effort to strengthen its agriculture sector, cultivated land in Saudi Arabia grew from 400,000 acres in 1976 to more than 8 million acres by 1993. For a sense of scale, the total area shown in this Overview is approximately forty square miles (32,000 acres).

#49 Rice Terraces, Yuanyang County, China

Rice Terraces, Yuanyang County, China
23°09′32″N 102°44′41″E. Rice paddies, constructed in steps, cover the mountainsides of Yuanyang County, China. Cultivated by the Hani people for the last 1300 years, the slope of the terraces varies from 15 to 75 degrees with some having as many as 3,000 steps. As we’ve been getting a lot of questions recently about prints, I want to mention that this Overview, and many others, can be purchased directly from our website in the Printshop section!

#50 Fruit Orchards, Huelva, Spain

Fruit Orchards, Huelva, Spain
37.714546°, -6.532834°. Fruit trees swirl on the hills of Huelva, Spain. The climate here is ideal for this growth with an average temperature of 17.8° C (64° F) and relative humidity between 60% and 80%.

#51 Los Caracoles Pass, Andes Mountains

Los Caracoles Pass, Andes Mountains
32°51’6″S 70°8’16″W. Los Caracoles Pass, or The Snails Pass, is a twisting mountain road located in a remote section of the Andes Mountains on the Chilean side of the border with Argentina. The path climbs to an elevation of 10,419 feet, has no roadside safety barriers, and is frequented by large trucks.

#52 Bahá’í House Of Worship, Wilmette, Illinois

Bahá'í House Of Worship, Wilmette, Illinois
42°4′27″N 87°41′3″W The Baha’i House of Worship in Wilmette, Illinois, is the oldest surviving Baha’i House of Worship in the world and the only one in the United States. The building contains an auditorium that seats 1,191 people beneath a 138 foot-high (42 m) domed structure. You’ll also notice that many components of the complex come in sets of nine as the number symbolizes perfection and completion in the Baha’i faith.

#53 Brøndby Haveby, Brønby Municipality, Denmark

Brøndby Haveby, Brønby Municipality, Denmark
55 ° 38 ’12.836031 “N, 12 ° 23′ 58.386726″ E

#54 Niagara Falls, Canada, United States

Niagara Falls, Canada, United States
43.077305°N 79.07562°W. Niagara Falls is the collective name for three waterfalls that straddle the border between Ontario, Canada, and the United States. Horseshoe Falls is seen here. The falls have the highest flow rate of any waterfall in the world, with a vertical drop of more than 165 feet (50 m). The Maid of the Mist, also visible here, is a boat that has carried passengers into the rapids below the falls since 1846.

#55 Sun City, Arizona, USA

Sun City, Arizona, USA
33.6189504, -112.291099. Houses, built in concentric circles, make up a section of Sun City, Arizona, USA. When the development opened on January 1, 1960, the event attracted a crowd of more than 100,000 onlookers and the “futuristic development” was featured on the cover of Time magazine.

#56 Plaça De Tetuan, Eixample District, Barcelona, Spain

Plaça De Tetuan, Eixample District, Barcelona, Spain
41.394921°N 2.175507°E. Plaça de Tetuan is a major square located in the Eixample district of Barcelona, Spain. The area characterized by its strict grid pattern, octagonal intersections, and apartments with communal courtyards.

#57 Plaza Del Ejecutivo, Mexico City, Mexico

Plaza Del Ejecutivo, Mexico City, Mexico
19.420511533°, -99.08808712°. This week we will be looking at fascinating examples of urban planning – a major focus of the Where We Design chapter in our new book “Overview”. To start off, here is one of our favorite shots of the radiating streets that surround the Plaza Del Ejecutivo in Mexico City, Mexico. If you have examples of other cities that you think might look particularly mesmerizing from above, please let us know in the comments on Facebook.

#58 Burning Man, Black Rock City, Nevada, USA

Burning Man, Black Rock City, Nevada, USA
40°47′13″N 119°12′16″W. Over the next few days, thousands of people from around the world will head to the desert in Nevada, the USA to construct Black Rock City. Laid out in a grid plan with radiating avenues named after the numbers on a clock, the city serves as home to roughly 60,000 people for Burning Man, an annual week-long event. Burning Man is described as an experiment in community, art, self-expression, and radical self-reliance. Additionally, residents in Black Rock City practice one of the event’s key principles of ‘Leave No Trace’ – meaning significant efforts are taken to make sure as the city is disassembled in the days following the festival, the desert returns to its original state.

#59 Cairo, Egypt

Cairo, Egypt
29°58′34″N 31°7′58″E. The Great Pyramids of Giza are located on the outskirts of Cairo, Egypt. Dating back to 2580 BC, the Great Pyramid, the largest structure at the site, is the oldest of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient world and the only one to remain largely intact. With an estimated 2,300,000 stone blocks weighing from 2 to 30 tons each, the 481-foot pyramid was the tallest structure in the world for more than 3,800 years.

#60 Central Park, New York City, New York, USA

Central Park, New York City, New York, USA
40°46’56”N; 73°57’55”W. Central Park in New York City spans 843 acres. That’s 6% of the island of Manhattan.

#61 Salt Ponds, San Francisco Bay, California, USA

Salt Ponds, San Francisco Bay, California, USA
37.5106531, -122.053325. The salt evaporation ponds seen here cover roughly 10 square miles (26 square km) in San Francisco Bay, California, USA. Salt is extracted from the water here through a lengthy process. First, water from the bay is channeled into massive basins where it begins a transformation into brines. Over five years, the brines evaporate, concentrate, and travel several miles before they are collected as pure salt crystals. The massive ponds get their vibrant color from a particular species of algae (Dunaliella) that thrives in extremely salty water and produces a red pigment.

#62 Norfolk, Virginia, US

Norfolk, Virginia, US
Train cars filled with coal are stationed in Norfolk, Virginia. Operated by the Norfolk Southern corporation, Lamberts Point Pier 6 is the largest coal-loading station in the Northern Hemisphere and serves at the temporary depot for the company’s fleet of 23,000 coal cars.

#63 Angkor Wat, Cambodia

Angkor Wat, Cambodia
Angkor Wat — a massive temple complex surrounded by a moat in Cambodia.

#64 Delhi, India

Delhi, India
28.614656°, 77.057758°. Delhi, India contains approximately 16 million residents. The neighborhoods of Santosh Park and Uttam Nagar, both pictured here, are home to some of the city’s poorest people and contain its most built-up and densely populated land. Numerous studies have shown a correlation between the wealth of a residential area and its total number of trees and the amount of green space. This Overview is a particularly striking example of that trend.

#65 Barcelona, Spain

Barcelona, Spain
41°23′27″N 2°09′47″E

#66 Davis-Monthan Air Force Base Aircraft Boneyard, Tucson, Arizona, USA

Davis-Monthan Air Force Base Aircraft Boneyard, Tucson, Arizona, USA
32.151087°, –110.826079°. The largest aircraft storage and preservation facility in the world is located at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base in Tucson, Arizona, USA. The boneyard—run by the 309th Airspace Maintenance and Regeneration Group—contains more than 4,400 retired American military and government aircraft.

#67 Southern California Logistics Airport, Victorville, California, USA

Southern California Logistics Airport, Victorville, California, USA
34°35′51″N 117°22′59″W. Here’s one of my favorite images from the Where We Waste chapter of “Overview”. The Southern California Logistics Airport in Victorville, California contains an aircraft boneyard with more than 150 retired planes. Because the demand for jumbo jets has dropped significantly in the last two decades in favor of smaller, more affordable twin‑engine planes, many large aircrafts such as Boeing 747s have been retired. The dry conditions in Victorville – located on the edge of the Mojave Desert – limits the corrosion of metal, meaning planes can be stored here for years while they are stripped for spare parts.

#68 Bastille Day, Paris, France

Bastille Day, Paris, France
48.8738°N 2.2950°E. Bastille Day or La Fête National as its known in France. The holiday commemorates the start of the French Revolution which began in 1789 with the Storming of the Bastille, a fortress and prison. In modern times, the day’s most celebrated event is a military parade through Paris that begins at the Arc de Triomphe – seen in this Overview – and ends at Place de la Concorde. Joyeux Quatorze Juliet!

#69 Statue Of Liberty, New York City, USA

Statue Of Liberty, New York City, USA
40°41′21″N 74°2′40″W. The incredible shot shows the Statue of Liberty in New York City. The colossal copper structure depicts a robed female figure — Libertas, the Roman goddess of liberty — who bears a torch and a tablet upon which is inscribed the date of the American Declaration of Independence — July 4, 1776. The statue is an American icon of freedom and welcoming sight to immigrants arriving from abroad.

#70 Glacial Melt, Skafta River, Iceland

Glacial Melt, Skafta River, Iceland
63.7751116, -18.09628. Glacial melting and flooding occur every year by the Skafta River in Iceland. As the water travels down towards the North Atlantic Ocean, incredible patterns are created on the hillsides. Rising lava, steam vents, or newly opened hot springs can all cause this rapid ice melt, leading to a sizable release of water that picks up sediment as it flows down from the glaciers.

#71 Lebrija 1 Solar Power Plant, Lebrija, Spain

Lebrija 1 Solar Power Plant, Lebrija, Spain
37.007977710°, -6.049280818°. The Lebrija 1 Solar Power Plant in Lebrija, Spain has comprised of approximately 170,000 individual mirrors installed on 6,048 parabolic troughs. If placed next to one another, the troughs would extend for 60 kilometers.

#72 Löyly, Helsinki, Finland

Löyly, Helsinki, Finland
60.152008, 24.921262. Löyly is a public sauna located on the edge of the Baltic Sea in Helsinki, Finland. The building, constructed with repurposed wood, features a shell-like design that has been described as a “tunturi” – the Finnish word for something in between a hill and a mountain. In total, Finland contains approximately 3.3 million saunas or roughly one per household. This incredible shot was shared with us by @joelmiikka

#73 Istanbul, Turkey

Istanbul, Turkey
Istanbul is the largest metropolitan area in Turkey, with a population of more than 14 million people.

#74 The Sepang Goldcoast Resort, Malaysia

The Sepang Goldcoast Resort, Malaysia

#75 Lombard Street, San Francisco, California, USA

Lombard Street, San Francisco, California, USA
37.802317, -122.419740. Lombard Street runs from east to west in San Francisco, California, USA. With eight hairpin turns dispersed over a one-block section in the Russian Hill neighborhood, Lombard is often referred to as “the most crooked street in the world.”

#76 Great Wall Of China, Northern China

40.67693°N 117.23193°E
Great Wall Of China, Northern China

#77 Sydney Opera House, Australia

Sydney Opera House, Australia
33°51′31.2″S 151°12′50.5″E. The Sydney Opera House hosts more than 1,500 shows each year in its various performance halls, drawing a total attendance of approximately 1.2 million people. While the buildings famous “shell” design appears uniformly white from a distance, it actually features a subtle chevron pattern composed of tiles in two colors: glossy white and matte cream.

#78 Coastline, El Hur, Somalia

Coastline, El Hur, Somalia
5°00′N 48°16′E. Waves roll into the shores of Somalia, by the village of El Hur. Located on the Horn of Africa, Somalia has the longest coastline on the mainland continent, stretching for more than 3,000 kilometers (1880 miles).

#79 Venice, Italy

Venice, Italy
45°26′15″N 12°20′9″E

#80 Medina Quarter, Marrakesh, Morocco

Medina Quarter, Marrakesh, Morocco
31.633080724°, -7.986173343°. The medina quarter in Marrakesh, Morocco is characterized by its winding, maze-like streets. Because the intricately connected honeycomb of alleyways narrows to less than a meter wide (~ 3 feet) at certain spots, the area is generally free from car traffic.

#81 Discovery Bay, California, USA

Discovery Bay, California, USA
37°54′31″N 121°36′01″W. Discovery Bay is a waterfront community built on a network of man-made dikes in Contra Costa County, California, USA. Development of the area began in 1964 is now home to roughly 13,352 residents. As seen in this Overview, many residents have private docks with boat access to the Sacramento–San Joaquin River Delta.

#82 Durrat Al Bahrain, Bahrain

Durrat Al Bahrain, Bahrain
25°50′17″N 50°36′18″E. Durrat Al Bahrain will consist of 15 connected, artificial islands (including six atolls, five fish-shaped, and two crescent-shaped). Construction costs are estimated at $6 billion and the project is slated for completion in mid-2015.

#83 Inman Yard, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

Inman Yard, Atlanta, Georgia, USA
33.800083, -84.451936. The Norfolk Southern Railway operates 21,300 miles of track in 22 states, primarily in the Southeastern US. Inman Yard in Atlanta, Georgia, pictured here, is one of the major railyards that houses a portion of the operation’s 3,648 locomotives and 79,082 freight cars.

#84 Arlit Uranium Mine, Arlit, Niger

Arlit Uranium Mine, Arlit, Niger
18°44′N 7°23′E. With just three days until the release of “Overview”, I’m sharing a few of my favorite images from the book. Here’s one from the chapter all about mining, ‘Where We Extract’. The Arlit Uranium mine is located in Arlit, Niger. French nuclear power generation, as well as the French nuclear weapons program, are dependent on the uranium that is extracted from the mine – more than 3400 tonnes per year.

#85 Atlantic Ocean

Atlantic Ocean
Ever wondered how the moon affects the tides of water on Earth? Long story short, its gravity. As the moon orbits the Earth, it exerts a gravitational pull on the Earth. Since the Earth is significantly larger, it doesn’t actually move towards the moon, but the water on its surface, being liquid, does move.

#86 Malé, Republic Of Maldives

Malé, Republic Of Maldives
41.75283°, 73.506694°. Malé is the capital and most populous city in the Republic of Maldives. With more than 47,000 residents per square kilometer (0.39 square miles), the heavily urbanized city constitutes the fifth most densely-populated island in the world. Malé and the other islands of the Maldives are located one meter (3 feet) above sea level.

#87 Plasticulture / Greenhouses, Almeria, Spain

Plasticulture / Greenhouses, Almeria, Spain
36.78234°N 2.74315°W. Plasticulture refers to the practice of using plastic materials in agricultural applications. This is visible in the plains and valleys of Almeria, Spain where nearly 20,000 hectares are covered by these greenhouse structures.

#88 Desert Shores Community, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA

Desert Shores Community, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
36.211001, -115.266914. The Desert Shores Community in Las Vegas, Nevada contains 3,351 units and four man-made lakes.

#89 Car Terminal, Richmond, California, USA

Car Terminal, Richmond, California, USA
37.9137118, -122.368161. Cars are unloaded and parked at an automobile terminal in Richmond, California, USA. In 2015, 17.5 million cars and light trucks were sold in the United States, raising the total number of registered vehicles in the country to roughly 253 million.

#90 White Island, Bay Of Plenty, New Zealand

White Island, Bay Of Plenty, New Zealand
37°31′S 177°11′E. Whakaari, also known as White Island, is an active stratovolcano, situated 48 km (30 mi) from the North Island of New Zealand in the Bay of Plenty. Whakaari is New Zealand’s most active volcano and has been built up by continuous eruptions over the past 150,000 years. The island is approximately 2 km (1.2 mi) in diameter and rises to a height of 321 m (1,053 ft) above sea level.

#91 La Plata, Buenos Aires, Argentina

La Plata, Buenos Aires, Argentina
34°55′16″S 57°57′16″W. The planned city of La Plata, the capital city of the Province of Buenos Aires, is characterized by its strict grid pattern. At the 1889 World’s Fair in Paris, the new city was awarded two gold medals for the “City of the Future” and “Better performance built.” This is the fifth of seven posts in our week focused on urban planning.

#92 Ipanema Beach, Rio De Janeiro, Brazil

Ipanema Beach, Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
22°59′01″S 43°12′16″W. All of the exciting coverage at the Olympics has us thinking of this beautiful Overview of Ipanema Beach in Rio de Janeiro! Frequently recognized as one of the most beautiful beaches in the world, its 2.25 miles of sand are divided into segments by lifeguard towers known as “postos.”

#93 Rodewald, Rodewald, Germany

Rodewald, Rodewald, Germany
52°39′57″N 09°28′56″E. Fields surround the residential area of Rodewald, Germany. The agricultural village was first mentioned in historical records from the early 13th Century and is now home to 2,549 people.

#94 Puente De Vallecas, Madrid, Spain

Puente De Vallecas, Madrid, Spain
40.398204°N 3.669059°W

#95 Agricultural Development, Loxahatchee, Florida, USA

Agricultural Development, Loxahatchee, Florida, USA

#96 Port Newark, Newark, New Jersey

Port Newark, Newark, New Jersey
40°40′54″N 74°09′02″W. Shipping containers are stacked at the Port Newark Container Terminal in Newark, New Jersey, USA. The massive facility handles over 600,000 shipping containers every year and has begun expansion projects that will increase annual capacity to 1.1 million containers by 2030.

#97 Karlsruhe, Germany

Karlsruhe, Germany
49°00′33″N 8°24′14″E. The city of Karlsruhe, Germany was planned with a palace tower at its center, surrounded by 32 radiating streets. Because the design resembled the ribs of a folding fan, the city is sometimes called the “fan city” or “Fächerstadt.” Additionally, this city’s urban plan gave rise to the geometry concept of “Karlsruhe Metric” which refers to a measure of distance that assumes travel is only possible along radial streets and along circular avenues around the center.

#98 Naarden, Netherlands

Naarden, Netherlands
52°18′N 5°10′E. Naarden is a star fort in the Netherlands. The city was constructed in the manner seen here so that an attack on any individual wall could be defended from the two adjacent star points by shooting at the enemy from behind. Today Naarden is home to roughly 17,000 residents.

#99 The Bicycle Snake, Copenhagen, Denmark

The Bicycle Snake, Copenhagen, Denmark
The Bicycle Snake (or Cykelslangen) is a 200-meter long ramp in Copenhagen, Denmark. The structure was created because 12,500 cyclists needed to bring their bikes up and down a large staircase each day. Instead of just replacing the staircase with a ramp, the architects proposed a plan with a new and beautiful approach to navigating the area. The Bicycle Snake now meanders 6-7 meters above the sea’s surface and is painted in a bright orange color to increase visibility for cyclists.

#100 Palm Island, Miami Beach, Florida, USA

Palm Island, Miami Beach, Florida, USA
25.783216°N 80.16052°W. Palm Island and Hibiscus Islands are two man-made islands located in Miami Beach, Florida. While the residential neighborhoods on the islands have some of the highest property values in the city, they are also among the first places ordered to evacuate in advance of a hurricane.

#101 New Bullards Bar Reservoir, Yuba County, California

New Bullards Bar Reservoir, Yuba County, California
39.42903°N 121.13010°W

#102 DuSable Harbor, Chicago, Illinois, USA

DuSable Harbor, Chicago, Illinois, USA
41.8798146,-87.618203. Sailboats are docked at DuSable Harbor in Chicago, Illinois, USA. The facility is located on Lake Michigan in the heart of the city’s downtown area and contains 420 slips for boats between 30 to 60 feet in length.

#103 Los Angeles International Airport, Los Angeles, California, USA

Los Angeles International Airport, Los Angeles, California, USA
33°56′33″N 118°24′29″W. This morning I’m flying to Los Angeles for a couple of days through the city’s international airport, commonly referred to as LAX. Last year, the facility handled nearly 75 million passengers, making it the seventh busiest in the world.

#104 Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

33°38′12″N 084°25′41″W. Hartsfield–Jackson International Airport in Atlanta, Georgia, USA is the busiest airport in the world by total passengers and number of flights. In 2015, ATL accommodated more than 101 million passengers and 882,000 flights. Dozens of planes departing and arriving at concourses A-D are seen in this Overview.
Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

#105 Halong Bay, Quảng Ninh Province, Vietnam

Halong Bay, Quảng Ninh Province, Vietnam
20°54′N 107°12′E. Hạ Long Bay, located in the Quảng Ninh Province of Vietnam, is a stunningly beautiful destination. Here, towering limestone pillars and tiny islands topped by a rich, green forest rise from the beautiful waters of the Gulf of Tonkin. Halong translates as ‘where the dragon descends into the sea’ and local legend suggests that this seascape was created when a great mountain dragon charged towards the coast, its flailing tail gouging out the valleys and crevasses in its path.

#106 Port Of Shanghai, Shanghai, China

Port Of Shanghai, Shanghai, China
30°37′35″N 122°03′53″E. The Port of Shanghai is the world’s busiest container port, handling more than 35 million TEUs (approximately 776 million tons) of cargo every year. That weight is roughly equal to 1.7 times the mass of all humans living on the planet.

#107 Central De Abasto, Mexico City, Mexico

Central De Abasto, Mexico City, Mexico
19°22′26.07″N 99°5′18.38″W. Thousands of trucks and cars surround the Central de Abasto – Mexico City’s largest wholesale market for produce and other foodstuffs. The market serves more than 300,000 people and handles over 30,000 tons of merchandise each day —representing 80% of the consumption of the Mexico City metropolitan area.

#108 Moscow Rings, Moscow, Russia

Moscow Rings, Moscow, Russia
55°45′N 37°37′E. Moscow is the capital and largest city in Russia with 12.2 million residents. The city is organized into five concentric transportation rings that surround the Kremlin. The two innermost rings are seen here.

#109 Neves-Corvo Mine, Castro Verde Municipality, Portugal

Neves-Corvo Mine, Castro Verde Municipality, Portugal
37°34′23″N 7°58′15″W. Waste ponds are seen at the Neves-Corvo Mine in the Castro Verde Municipality in Portugal. Zinc and copper and the primary resources extracted from the mine and the byproducts of that extraction is sent to these basins three kilometers away. Typically, once waste materials are pumped into a tailings pond, they are mixed with water to create a sloppy form of mud known as slurry. The slurry is then pumped through magnetic separation chambers to extract usable ore and increase the mine’s total output.

#110 Venture Out Rv Resort, Mesa, Arizona, USA

Venture Out Rv Resort, Mesa, Arizona, USA
33.411791, -111.723591

#111 Port Of Tanjung Priok, Jakarta, Indonesia

Port Of Tanjung Priok, Jakarta, Indonesia
6.104°S 106.8865°E. Dozens of massive cargo ships and tankers – some weighing up to 300,000 tons – are anchored outside the Port of Tanjung Priok in Jakarta, Indonesia. The facility is the country’s busiest and most advanced seaport, handling more than 50% of Indonesia’s trans-shipment cargo. The port is also among the least efficient in all of Southeast Asia, due to slow customs handling and limited docking capacity.

#112 Olympic Tennis Center, Rio De Janeiro, Brazil

Olympic Tennis Center, Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
22.978822°S 43.396382°W

#113 Judge Harry Pregerson Interchange, Los Angeles, California

Judge Harry Pregerson Interchange, Los Angeles, California
33.9287°N 118.281°W. Today I’ll be traveling throughout the freeway network of Los Angeles, well known for its massive interchanges (and traffic). The Judge Harry Pregerson Interchange is a stack highway interchange located near the Athens and Watts neighborhoods in South LA. This junction is composed of five levels that scale to a staggering height of more than 40 meters (132 feet).

#114 Maggie Daley Park, Chicago, Illinois, USA

Maggie Daley Park, Chicago, Illinois, USA
41°52′57″N 87°37′08″W. This Overview shows Maggie Daley Park in Chicago, Illinois, USA. The park’s Buckingham Fountain stands out in this Overview with its ornate design and serve as a gathering point for thousands of visitors at the Lollapalooza festival this weekend.

#115 Port Of Rotterdam, Holland

Port Of Rotterdam, Holland
From 1962 until 2002, Rotterdam was the world’s busiest port, but was overtaken first by Singapore and later by Shanghai.

#116 Jeongwang-Dong, Ansan, South Korea

Jeongwang-Dong, Ansan, South Korea
37.336147372°, 126.718586767°. Jeongwang-dong is an industrial sector in the city of Ansan, South Korea. The Korean government intensively drove a plan to develop the modern city, particularly in this area, with an emphasis on manufacturing. The striking blue color that you see here results from the use of aluminum roofing, which is used for its low cost and longevity.

#117 Amazon Rainforest Deforestation, Para, Brazil

Amazon Rainforest Deforestation, Para, Brazil
5°40′S 52°44′W. Clearcutting operations in the Amazon Rainforest of Para, Brazil branch out from one of the state’s central roads.

#118 Port Of Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, USA

Port Of Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, USA
33°43′45″N 118°15′43″W

#119 Residential Development, Killeen, Texas, USA

Residential Development, Killeen, Texas, USA
31.079844, -97.80145. In 2013, there were 923,400 home construction projects in the United States.

#120 L’Enfant Plan, Washington, D.C, USA

L'Enfant Plan, Washington, D.C, USA
38°53′26″N 77°1′13″W. The city’s L’Enfant Plan was developed in 1791 by Major Pierre Charles L’Enfant for George Washington, the first President of the United States. L’Enfant designed a compass-aligned grid for the city’s streets, with intersecting diagonal avenues that were later named after the states of the union. The diagonal avenues also intersect with the north-south and east-west streets at circles and rectangular plazas in order to create more open, green spaces. Lastly, L’Enfant laid out a 400 foot-wide (122 meters) garden-lined “grand avenue” – what is now known as the National Mall – that connects the US Capitol Building, the Washington Monument, and the Lincoln Memorial (the latter two are visible at right in this Overview).

#121 London, England, UK

London, England, UK
51°30′26″N 0°7′39″W. London is the capital and most populous city in the United Kingdom.

#122 Boca Raton, Florida, USA

Boca Raton, Florida, USA
26°22′7″N 80°6′0″W

#123 Our Lady Of Almudena Cemetery, Madrid, Spain

Our Lady Of Almudena Cemetery, Madrid, Spain
40°25′10″N 3°38′26″W. Our Lady of Almudena Cemetery in Madrid, Spain is one of the largest cemeteries in the world. The number of gravesites – estimated at five million – is greater than the population of Madrid itself.

#124 Capital Hill, Canberra, Australia

Capital Hill, Canberra, Australia
35°18′29″S 149°07′28″E. The construction of Parliament House in Canberra, Australia involved the removal of the top half of Capital Hill (the mound on which the structure was built). After the project was completed, much of the displaced earth was replaced on top of the building where a lush, green lawn now grows. While much of Canberra was designed by Walter Burley Griffin in 1913, this specific complex opened in 1988, is designed to look like two boomerangs and contains approximately 4,400 rooms.

#125 L’eixample, Valencia, Spain

L'eixample, Valencia, Spain
39°27′53″N 0°22′12″W. The urban plan of the L’Eixample district in Valencia, Spain is characterized by long straight streets, a strict grid pattern crossed by wide avenues and apartments with communal courtyards. A similar layout was used for the district of the same name in Barcelona. The circular structure in the upper right is the Plaza de Toros de Valencia – the city’s largest bullfighting arena.

#126 Bosphorus Bridge, Istanbul, Turkey

Bosphorus Bridge, Istanbul, Turkey
41°02′43″N 29°02′04″E. The Bosphorus Bridge is one of two suspension bridges that connects Europe and Asia across the Bosphorus Strait in Istanbul, Turkey.

#127 London Suburb Of Dagenham, UK

London Suburb Of Dagenham, UK

#128 Seattle-Tacoma International Airport, Seattle, Washington, USA

Seattle-Tacoma International Airport, Seattle, Washington, USA
My flight to Seattle-Tacoma International Airport will be one of the roughly 380,000 aircraft movements that take place at the facility each year and I will be one of roughly 42 million passengers that travel through the airport annually. The facility also contains a 13,000-car parking garage, the largest structure of its kind in North America, which is visible at the top of this Overview.

#129 Stade De Franc Saint-Dennis, France

Stade De France Saint-Dennis, France
48°55′28″N 2°21′36″E. In a less than an hour, France will square off against Portugal in the finals of Euro 2016 — the championship tournament of European football (soccer) that takes place every four years. The match will be played in Stade de France, the nation’s largest stadium that has a seating capacity of 81,338. Enjoy the game!

#130 Trujillo, Peru

Trujillo, Peru
8°6′43.2″S 79°1′43.68″W. Trujillo is the second largest city in Peru with slightly less than 800,000 residents in its urban area. España Avenue – the circular road that is visible at the center of this Overview – contains the city’s monument area and also traces the historical outline of the defensive wall that was constructed around the city in 1786.

#131 Montauk Point Light, Montauk, New York, USA

Montauk Point Light, Montauk, New York, USA
41°4′15.480″N 71°51′25.528″W. Montauk Point Light is a lighthouse located at the easternmost point of Long Island in the hamlet of Montauk, New York. With its construction authorized by George Washington in April 1792, the building was the first of its kind in New York and is the fourth oldest active lighthouse in the United States.

#132 Caracas, Venezuela

Caracas, Venezuela
10°30′N 66°55′W. Caracas is the capital and largest city in Venezuela, with more than three million residents. In recent months, plummeting oil prices combined with a significant drought has created a dire situation in cities across the nation. Four-hour blackouts are now a regular occurrence and some regions go without power for days at a time. Most supermarkets have almost no food to sell, hospitals have no medicine, and crime is rampant and escalating.

#133 Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington County, Virginia

Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington County, Virginia
38°52′48″N 77°04′12″W. In honor of Memorial Day in the United States, we’ve selected an Overview of Arlington National Cemetery outside of Washington, D.C. Since the American Civil War, the 624-acre cemetery has become the final resting place for veterans of the nation’s conflicts. The structure seen here is the Arlington Memorial Amphitheater that also contains the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier.

#134 Spaghetti Junction, Knoxville, Tennessee, USA

Spaghetti Junction, Knoxville, Tennessee, USA
35.9663844, -83.929399. A highway interchange connects Interstates 40 and 275 outside of Knoxville, Tennessee, USA. Because of its intertwined construction, a structure like this is commonly called a “spaghetti junction.”

#135 Miami Beach, Miami Beach, Florida, USA

Miami Beach, Miami Beach, Florida, USA
25.783742, -80.128644. Umbrellas and beachgoers dot the sands of Miami Beach, Florida, USA. This area is one of the most popular tourist destinations in the country, attracting nearly 15 million visitors each year.

#136 Port Newark-Elizabeth Marine Terminal, Newark, New Jersey, USA

Port Newark-Elizabeth Marine Terminal, Newark, New Jersey, USA

#137 Agricultural Development, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

Agricultural Development, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
9°1′48″N 38°44′24″E

#138 Spaghetti Junction (A-3 And M-50), Madrid, Spain

Spaghetti Junction (A-3 And M-50), Madrid, Spain
40.360051, -3.564548. The A-3 and M-50 highways come together in an interwoven crossroads southeast of Madrid, Spain. This structure is commonly called a “spaghetti junction.”

#139 Brick Kilns, Dhaka, Bangladesh

Brick Kilns, Dhaka, Bangladesh
23.7675749, 90.318299. Kilns for firing and making bricks are scattered across the landscape in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Almost all bricks in the country are made using a 150-year-old process where the soil is mixed with water, formed into bricks using wooden molds, left to dry in the sun, and then burned in these orange, traditional kilns. As the widespread use of old kilns has hampered air quality in the country, local groups and the government have been working hard to increase the use of “clean” brick kilns with more sustainable technology.

#140 Clearcutting In The El Dorado National Forest, Georgetown, California, USA

Clearcutting In The El Dorado National Forest, Georgetown, California, USA
38°45′01″N 120°20′00″W. 20-acre clearcutting tracts in the El Dorado National Forest.

#141 309th Aerospace Maintenance And Regeneration Group Tucson, Arizona, USA

309th Aerospace Maintenance And Regeneration Group Tucson, Arizona, USA
32.170890°N 110.855184°W

Leave a Reply

avatar
  Subscribe  
Notify of